IT HAS TO BE DONE

Is an old business name for us and we are now known as

Double "R" Wasp Nest Treatment Heanor

DIRECT CONTACT   MOBILE 07496360343

Open Mon - Sat inclusive 8.30am - 7pm

Sunday CLOSED all day

THE FOLLOWING PAGES ARE FOR YOUR GUIDANCE ONLY, DUE TO RETIREMENT WE NO LONGER CARRY OUT MOULD TREATMENTS BUT CAN GIVE ADVICE IF REQUIRED. IF YOU REQUIRE US TO CARRY OUT A SURVEY IT WILL COST £150.00 IF WITHIN OUR WASP TREATMENT AREA AS SHOWN ON OUR MAIN WEBSITE

doublerwasptreatmentheanor.co.uk/areascovered

Mould Mould Facts Condensation Bleach and Mould Pests and Mould Waterproofing Airborne Spores

Surface condensation is the most common cause of mould growth in the UK.

However, it is also important to note that the long term maintenance of high humidities without condensation will also cause moulds to develop in stagnant areas especially on moisture sensitive materials, such as leather, some cloths and paper.

What species of mould grows where depends on a number of factors including the humidity and the particular substrate.

Also note that the ‘colour’ of the mould will depend on the particular species – not all moulds are black!

‘TOXIC MOULDS’

Note: the term ‘toxic mould’ was given by the media – it is not a scientific description!!

There are 4 species of moulds that are considered to be a so-called ‘toxic mould’

Stachybotrys – a black/brown mould that grows on cellulose substrates, eg, paper, cardboard; slimy: requires very wet/damp substrate such as following flooding, Penicillium (normally green in colour), Aspergillus, Fusarium, Stachybotrys chartarum

Stachybotrys is a genus of moulds that are present in the environment. This mould is normally dark brown or black in colour and it can look slimy: on cellulose substrates (paper/cardboard).

Note: many other common indoor moulds can look similar to Stachybotrys (including Cladosporium – an extremely common surface mould in the UK)

Interstitial Condensation

Interstitial condensation is more likely to occur where there is:

An external vapour check which prevents the successful passage of moisture laden air out through the wall, eg, very dense renders, impermeable external finishes, and where there is a high internal moisture production. Most of the year there is more water vapour within a property than outside - water vapour therefore moves out through cracks, windows, etc, but also through the through the building fabric itself, the latter being the reason why we suggest a microporous only sealant to be used on the outside when water sealing the walls.

Interstitial condensation can often occur in older properties where the cavity is very narrow ie approx 25 mm, often during the build or when any alterations have taken place, debris will fall down the already narrow cavity causing an even smaller gap, this allows the temperature change between the outside wall and the inside wall to be very minimal, often causing damp spots internally in the cold weather. I have found that some insulation companies are now stating that they can cavity insulate these narrow cavities. In all of my years in the building trade I do not believe that this is a good idea in the older properties with narrow cavities as the thermal gain between the walls will be minimal, and as such could easily give rise to damp and mould internally.