WASPS AND HORNET TREATMENTS

WE DO NOT DO "FROM" PRICES, JUST A FIXED PRICE FOR ALL SIZES OF NEST

Death from wasp stings is rapid, when compared to death from snake venom; 66%of susceptible victims die within one hour of being stung.

By the end of the summer, a beach ball sized nest may house over 20,000 wasps.

Wasps love them or hate them, but they are here to stay, they are recognisable by the sweet tooth at the front end, a black and yellow body in the middle and a nasty sting at the back end.

The chemical used for wasp nest treatment is the same no matter where the nest is situated and so please do not be duped into thinking that special chemicals and licences are required for gutter level or under ground treatments.

If you do not treat a wasp or hornets nest it WILL get bigger and busier throughout the year.

Wasp/hornets nest treatment is £45.00 for any size nest. Further nests treated at the same time and at the same premises will incur an extra cost of £15.00 each.

However if anyone near to you has an allergy to wasps, it is better to treat the wasp nests as soon as it is spotted, if you have an allergy and you get stung you can die within 1 hour of being stung, is that a risk that is worth taking for you or your loved ones for a mere £45.00 for any sized wasp nest treatment.

At Double "R" Wasp Treatment Heanor, we guarantee that any wasp or hornet nest that we treat will be dead after we have made our first visit, if not the same nest will be treated absolutely free of charge after the initial payment, subject to us being informed after two days and before one calendar month of the original treatment, of any activity seen at the same entrance hole as the treated nest. Any other entrances can be deemed as another nest and as such will be chargeable.

We advise that as soon as wasp activity is noticed, you check to see if they are entering the property or not, if so you may need to contact a pest controller to have it treated before it becomes a serious nuisance, also bear in mind that an active nest is easy to destroy / treat, whereas over wintering queens are not, due to them hiding in the insulation etc.

IF YOU DO NOT DESTROY A WASP NEST IN YOUR LOFT, YOU WILL ALMOST CERTAINLY HAVE A PROBLEM OVER THE WINTER TIME WHEN THE NEW QUEENS WILL OVER WINTER IN YOUR INSULATION.

Any wasp or hornet treatments required for hibernating wasps or hornets in the loft insulation over the cold winter months, can be treated but will not carry any guarantees. This is normally at the end of September onwards until spring. The initial BASIC TREATMENT cost will be the same as a normal wasp nest treatment (£45.00) but may alter depending on size of area to be treated. This treatment is different to normal wasp nest treatment and does not use a powder.


Ants ~ Bees ~ Carpet Beetle ~ Cluster Flies ~ Fleas


A few facts about wasps


The common wasp (Vespula vulgaris) and the German wasp (Vespula germanica), are important as pest species. Both overwinter as queens, the common wasp usually hibernating in buildings or underground, the German wasp typically in tree cavities. The young queen emerges in the spring, feeding on nectar and sap and begins to construct her new nest from wasp paper, a mixture she concocts from chewed wood, plant debris and saliva. Favourite places for nests are in the ground, hollow trees, eaves, attics or garden sheds. Her first batch of eggs is produced within a few days and the larvae develop within the nest. The mature larvae construct silken cocoons in which they pupate, still within the cells of the nest. Four to six weeks later, the first generation of workers emerge. They are smaller than the queen and all female – male wasps emerge later in the season. The workers then take over the ongoing nest construction, enveloping the whole nest in wasp paper, which could by now extend to eight tiers. They also forage for food, ventilate the nest (by vibrating their wings) and nurture and feed the developing wasp larvae. The queen now spends all her time egg laying, each cell being used numerous times to rear larvae. By the end of the summer, a nest may house over 20,000 wasps. With the onset of autumn, new males emerge to fertilise new queens who go on to search for hibernation sites. After a successful mating the female normally kills the male, thus ensuring  the strongest possible nest the following year.

During the winter months the old queen and workers die and the nest will not be reused.


CONTROL Despite a high mortality rate, the need to control wasps is more and more obvious, especially as the number of infestations appears to be increasing.